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Memorising Your Masonic Rituals And What To Wear In The Lodge

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  • Memorising Your Masonic Rituals And What To Wear In The Lodge

    Here I'll Post How To Memorising Your Masonic Rituals And What To Wear In The LodgeMemorise Your Masonic Rituals..
    These Are Memorization Tactics For Freemasons, And How To Wear, And Dress In Your Uniform

    Learn how to memorize long presentations quickly with these tips and tricks. It's no secret that Freemasons have to memorize large amounts of text for their meetings. Since the text was written hundreds of years ago, it doesn't always sound familiar to our current way of speaking, which makes it even harder to remember. For example, remembering a charge written by Master Mason Paul Revere back in the year 1795 can be a challenge. Please feel welcome to show this video as an educational piece for your next lodge meeting. This presentation has been given live for several lodges around the Chicago area, and by making it available through YouTube, you can just project the video on a screen so your lodge can learn from it. Using the tactics discussed in this short video, you learn how to make the memorization process easier. You'll even see specific examples used in memorizing the Paul Revere Charge. Learn to memorize the rituals faster and perform better at your degrees.

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    Learning Masonic Rituals
     

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    • #3
      How To Practice Masonic Rituals
       

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      • #4
        Presenting Masonic Rituals
         

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        • #5
          The Correct Way On Wearing Your Masonic Apron
           

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          • #6
            Wearing Masonic Ties. And Gloves
             

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            • #7
              Basic Masonic Dress
               

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              • #8
                How To Wear Masonic Jewels
                 

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                • #9
                  The Warden of the Lodge. . .shall take trial of the art of memory and science thereof of every fellow craft and every apprentice according to their vocation and in case that they have lost any point thereof. . . pay the penalty as follows for their slothfulness.. . Second Schaw Statutes of 1599. Issued by William Schaw, the royally appointed Master of the Works, the Statutes gave a code of rules governing the activities of operative masons in Scotland. It’s often considered the first conception of Freemasonry as exists today. During the sixteenth century, Art of Memory had far greater connotations than it may to the modern reader. It referred to a specific set of memory disciplines and techniques whereby one would create a memory palace. This could be based on a real or imaginary place which, using intensive imagination, one would build up in the memory to the degree that it could be easily visited and used as a kind of mnemonic storehouse. By Schaws time, this art of memory existed in many different forms. Not only was it commonly believed to be a very good method of memorising speeches, but also a great form of moral training - a goal common to Freemasonry. Beyond this,there were some who believed that this mysterious art had far more potential and could even have supernatural effects on the world. So why did Schaw make it mandatory for Masons to practice the art of memory, and why did they need to be tested in this art? Was it a reference to Masonic ritual and if so, does this mean the Masonic lodge is a form of memory palace? If this is indeed the case, then by exploring what school of mnemonics it evolved from it can tell us something of the intentions behind the ritual. Was Masonry developed as a form of moral training for good Christian builders, or could its rituals have evolved from a more ambitious or mystical purpose?
                   

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                  • #10
                    This video takes a look at the Masonic practice of memorization of ritual and why we may use memorization in our practices.
                     

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                    • #11
                      The Hermetic Art of Memory

                      During the intellectual swirl of the mystic Renaissance the phrase Art of Memory referred to a specific set of memory disciplines and techniques that had evolved from classical Greek mnemonics. This was a method whereby one would create a memory palace in the mind. This could be based on a real or imagined place which, using intensive imagination, one would build up in the memory to the degree that it could be visited with ease. This memory palace could then be used as a kind of memory storehouse. By placing items in different locations in the palace one could recall them with ease when the palace was next visited. In order to make the images memorable the characters, figures or items used were often dramatic and could sometimes be quite striking to contemporary sensibilities. This meditative art was commonly accepted to be a very good method for memorising speeches, but also a great form of moral training. However, some practitioners took it further, believing that this art had far more potential. They believed that if practised in the correct way this art could lead to an expansion of awareness and mental ability. This inner transformation would not only lead to perfect memory, but would gift the practitioner with higher awareness and total mastery of self.
                       

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                      • #12
                        Freemasons Guide Looking Good At The Lodge
                        Would you know what to wear to your first meeting at the Lodge? Our advice is to build a wardrobe based on foundation pieces like black or dark suits, classic shoes and crisp white shirts. Simply use these neutral pieces as a base that can be reinvented to fit any event the Lodge may hold.

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